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JK Slayer
02-19-2015, 08:16 PM
I moved my router into a different part of the house and am having wifi problems. I believe part of the problem is concrete block interfering. Looking into adding a second wireless router or something to expand the wifi coverage. Looking for options. Thanks

aroundincircles
02-19-2015, 08:29 PM
Adding a 2nd wifi router is pretty easy, just add it as a bridge.

Lots of how to videos on youtube, and if you buy a 2nd router it usually comes with instructions on how to do it.

also look into wireless routers that support dual band wireless. That means they support 2.4ghz as well as 5ghz spectrums, and the 5 ghz seems to have less interference issues. but it is only supported by devices that support it, but most devices that are a couple of years old or newer do.

JK Slayer
02-19-2015, 09:11 PM
Ok, thanks for the help, I will mess with it this weekend. I will see what happens.

XJ_Jeeper01
02-19-2015, 09:21 PM
You can also look into wifi extenders. I have a Netgear N300 range extender and it works great. My main modem and router are upstairs and I have the extender downstairs. I really just use it so I don't have to run a really long cable down to my xbox downstairs since it has an ethernet port on it.
http://www.netgear.com/home/products/networking/wifi-range-extenders/

Tru
02-19-2015, 09:34 PM
I'm using a Securifi Almond at home and I'm happy with it. http://www.securifi.com/almond
It has a touch screen to set it up and took about 5 minutes.

bmlbytes
02-20-2015, 06:36 AM
AZDIESELPOWER, Here is what you need to do.

Buy a second wireless router. Run a CAT5e or CAT6 cable from your current wireless router to where you want the new one to be.

Before plugging in the new router, connect the new router to a computer like this.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-001_en_v9.png

Look up how to change the router to "Bridged Mode" or how to turn off DHCP and NAT. Bridged mode automatically turns those off.
Give the new router an IP address different to the current router. The subnet masks should be the same on both routers (usually 255.255.255.0). Set the default gateway on the new router to the IP address of the current router (usually 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1).

Here is an example of what the new router's configuration might look like on a Linksys router.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-007_en_v9a.png

Go into the wireless settings. Make sure to set the SSID to be EXACTLY the same as the current router. The passphrase and encryption type should also be exactly the same. The channel should be at least three channels away from your current router. For example, if the current router channel is 1, make it be 4 or higher.

Finally, hook up the new router like this.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-008_en_v9.png

You can unplug the computer now and test the wifi in that area.

Your computer should jump automatically to the new router once the signal gets weak enough that it can not hold a good connection with the first router.


If you need some help with this, just send me a PM.

rmbk-over-pls
02-20-2015, 06:54 AM
^ great help here.

ShmUDE
02-20-2015, 07:04 AM
you dont want a router. you want an Access Point.

bmlbytes
02-20-2015, 07:48 AM
you dont want a router. you want an Access Point.

Well sure, until you realize that the routers are cheaper than the access points much of the time (which doesn't make any sense to me).

If you did buy an access point, there is a lot less configuration that you have to do. Putting a router in "bridged" mode, essentially makes it an access point.

JK Slayer
02-20-2015, 07:53 AM
AZDIESELPOWER, Here is what you need to do.

Buy a second wireless router. Run a CAT5e or CAT6 cable from your current wireless router to where you want the new one to be.

Before plugging in the new router, connect the new router to a computer like this.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-001_en_v9.png

Look up how to change the router to "Bridged Mode" or how to turn off DHCP and NAT. Bridged mode automatically turns those off.
Give the new router an IP address different to the current router. The subnet masks should be the same on both routers (usually 255.255.255.0). Set the default gateway on the new router to the IP address of the current router (usually 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.1.1).

Here is an example of what the new router's configuration might look like on a Linksys router.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-007_en_v9a.png

Go into the wireless settings. Make sure to set the SSID to be EXACTLY the same as the current router. The passphrase and encryption type should also be exactly the same. The channel should be at least three channels away from your current router. For example, if the current router channel is 1, make it be 4 or higher.

Finally, hook up the new router like this.
http://sw.nohold.net/Linksys/Images/kb24583-008_en_v9.png

You can unplug the computer now and test the wifi in that area.

Your computer should jump automatically to the new router once the signal gets weak enough that it can not hold a good connection with the first router.


If you need some help with this, just send me a PM.

Due to the setup of the house, I would rather not run a line. Can this router or access point be connected just via wifi?

I am planning on going to bestbuy to see what they have, if they dont have what I need I will order it. I am just looking for the easiest way to do this.

Thanks for the help.

JK Slayer
02-20-2015, 07:58 AM
It looks like the almond or an extender might do the trick. I will look into it some more and see what the store has. Thanks

aroundincircles
02-20-2015, 08:02 AM
Due to the setup of the house, I would rather not run a line. Can this router or access point be connected just via wifi?

I am planning on going to bestbuy to see what they have, if they dont have what I need I will order it. I am just looking for the easiest way to do this.

Thanks for the help.

easiest way is to buy a router/wifi access point, and bridge them. this is done via wifi, no cables needed (except power, and the original internet connection). without knowing the layout of the house, placement recommendation will be hard, but I would guess that the 2nd access point will need to be placed as close to the brick wall as possible, but on the same side as the other access point.

My parents have a similar issue, brick walls between rooms, so to get internet from the office to the master bedroom, I had to set up 3 access points... Normally overkill, but necessary in their case. One in the office, one in the living room, and the last one in the hall closet.

bmlbytes
02-20-2015, 08:10 AM
Due to the setup of the house, I would rather not run a line. Can this router or access point be connected just via wifi?

Some can, most cant.

What you are probably wanting is a WiFi Repeater (sometimes called a Range Extender). You can find them pretty cheap. They may make the wifi just a bit slower than if you had a separate access point or router, but they should work.

You could also run a line by using a powerline adapter. They use your existing power lines to send the signal. It basically gives you a wired connection without running new cables. This would also be a bit slower than running a cable, but not by a ton. The only caveat to these, is that the two outlets need to be on the same power phase. They don't have to be on the same circuit breaker, but if they are, then you know they are on the same phase.

IOwnCalculus
02-20-2015, 08:48 AM
While wireless repeaters are an option, they will also really hurt your wireless performance. It might still be better than no repeater, but it will be slower than if your second unit was hardwired. Connecting it via powerline will probably be a better option. There are actually some combo units that have a built-in powerline adapter and wireless access point, but I've never used them to see if they are any good or not.

Also, on the wireless channels - there are really only three channels that should be used, 1, 6, and 11. Channels 2-5 overlap both 1 and 6, and channels 7-10 overlap both 6 and 11. If you want to see what channels you should be using, grab a WiFi Analyzer app for your phone and see which of those three channels has the least congestion.

Unless you live in a neighborhood where you actually have some real distance between neighbors, expect them all to suck a bit.

Geeepin
02-20-2015, 10:18 AM
I moved my router into a different part of the house and am having wifi problems. Looking for options. Thanks

Move it back to where it was before? I assume it was fine before the move. Done ;)

Lets dive in here a bit I have a few questions.

Is the concrete block inside your home?
Is this interfering with inside coverage or outside coverage?
Are you broadcasting in N,B or G ?
Are you running mixed mode?
How many users?
Are you running QOS priorities?
Are you running security? if yes, what level. If no, your neighbors love you and that van parked outside loves you too :)
Are you experience more performance based problems or signal reception issues?

redneck20
02-20-2015, 06:06 PM
I don't know if it's the case for all routers but my belkin and netgear routers would barely. Give me full signal thru the house especially upstairs , I've recently switched to a apple router and now I can get full strength signal in the parking lot across the street +50yards from the house


-- Nate

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

JK Slayer
02-22-2015, 07:32 PM
I may have went sideways here. Straighten me out!

Current modem is a cicsco DPQ3925 and router is a net gear N300. I went to bestbuy and talked to the cox guy. He talked me into a Motorola SB6183 and a Nighthawk X6. Also, from what I know we have the 150mbps package or whatever. The cox guy said this modem/router would solve my problems (he said i might need an extender if we have a dead spot) Is he correct? Do we really need this modem/router?

Long story short, our original house is a rectangle size and made out of cinder block. The previous owners added on a square to the rectangle with wood construction, so now the house is more or less an L shape. The current modem/router worked fine in the rectangle portion of the house and we never needed wifi in the square. Now the main computer which I never use is going in the square and I use wifi in the rectangle.

The two problems I recognize are:
-cinder block is causing problems.
-the modem/wireless router is in the farthest corner of the house in the square. I am trying to figure out a better place for this. But the desktop computer needs to stay in the square.

So straighten me out. I would rather be wrenching on something...lol

Thanks for the help everyone!

IOwnCalculus
02-22-2015, 08:00 PM
The 6183 is a bit of overkill, but it won't have any direct bearing on your wireless performance. The Cox guy is always going to sell you on the newest / highest-end modem because every new revision lets them cram more users in the same overused pipe, while claiming that they totally have to limit your monthly bandwidth because it costs too much. To rule it in/out, do a speedtest from something hardwired to the router.

Geeepin
02-22-2015, 08:09 PM
Extend the power and cat5/6 from the router and mount it on the ceiling or high wall; close to the door way between the two rooms. " Think line of sight"

The router you have will do just fine. No need to spend 300 bucks in a new AP with functions you'll never really need/ use.


Uniquely crafted from my fat fingers.

bmlbytes
02-22-2015, 08:12 PM
So straighten me out. I would rather be wrenching on something...lol


Powerline adapter is probably best if it's just one desktop in a part of the house that doesn't have WiFi.

Something like this.
http://www.amazon.com/TP-LINK-TL-PA4010KIT-Powerline-Adapter-Starter/dp/B00AWRUICG

JK Slayer
03-01-2015, 11:20 AM
I ran a speedtest and it came in at 130. I don't think I need a new modem. Now on to figuring the wireless out.

How bad well the extenders mess up the 130 speed?

ShmUDE
03-01-2015, 12:42 PM
I ran a speedtest and it came in at 130. I don't think I need a new modem. Now on to figuring the wireless out.

How bad well the extenders mess up the 130 speed?

alot. Wifi in general will mess up that kind of speed. for a gigabit connection, 100mbps is about the max throughput for it (using round numbers). A 100mb ethernet connection has a throughput of about 10mbps.

What kind of wifi do you have? that will determine what speeds you will see. Remember, if you have a 300N router and only a G laptop, you will get crap speeds because of the G card.

JK Slayer
03-01-2015, 02:03 PM
What speed will that X6 throw wifi at?

JK Slayer
03-01-2015, 02:04 PM
alot. Wifi in general will mess up that kind of speed. for a gigabit connection, 100mbps is about the max throughput for it (using round numbers). A 100mb ethernet connection has a throughput of about 10mbps.

What kind of wifi do you have? that will determine what speeds you will see. Remember, if you have a 300N router and only a G laptop, you will get crap speeds because of the G card.

What do you mean by throughput?

ShmUDE
03-01-2015, 04:08 PM
What speed will that X6 throw wifi at?

according to netgear.com
"With up to 600 Mbps at 2.4GHz with QAM support + 1.3 Gbps at 5.0GHz + 1.3 Gbps at 5.0GHz tri-band Wi-Fi help ensure rapid performance and help ensure all of your home's devices stay connected."

so on a 2.4GHz card, you will only get 600mb with QAM if your card supports that. So thats basically around 60mbps of throughput

ShmUDE
03-01-2015, 04:10 PM
What do you mean by throughput?

throughput is how fast your data actually transfers at. On a local gigabit network i can transfer a large file from a server to my computer at about 100mb per second. So a movie around 2GB in size will take about 20 seconds to transfer.

JK Slayer
03-01-2015, 05:03 PM
Thanks for the help.

I am going to move the wifi through the house and see where the problems are. I also think the n300 is a problem.

JK Slayer
03-25-2015, 10:09 AM
Thanks everyone!