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Ryan
01-04-2008, 03:40 PM
ok time for my first but not last dumb new guy question. what does runing open mean?

Antman
01-04-2008, 03:43 PM
ok time for my first but not last dumb new guy question. what does runing open mean?

Running open means no lockers in the axles Ryan.:sifone:

Lifes A Jeep
01-04-2008, 03:43 PM
Wikipedia has a good write up on Locking Diffs...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locking_differentials

terron gregg
01-04-2008, 03:45 PM
ill take a stab that you do not have lockers so therefore your differential is not locked( both wheels spin at the same time) open ( one wheel spins least with traction)

terron gregg
01-04-2008, 03:45 PM
im a slow typer

sunroom2004
01-04-2008, 03:53 PM
Open differentials make it more difficult to get through obstacles...like ruts and rock gardens. The tire with the least amount of traction will get most of the torque while the wheels with the most traction will remain idle. The torque will take the "path of least resistance."

When you put a locker in offroad capability improves dramatically. Even if you get 1 tire off the ground, the other tire still gets torque so you can keep moving.

Open differentials are best suited for on-pavement driving while lockers are less pavement-friendly.

ROKBITR
01-04-2008, 04:02 PM
I'm sure you will be surprised where your jeep will take you with open differentials. I am still currently open, and have taken lines rigs that are locked have taken.

kemolewis
01-04-2008, 05:58 PM
I'm sure you will be surprised where your jeep will take you with open differentials. I am still currently open, and have taken lines rigs that are locked have taken.

Me too. I have done lines that I have been told that I wouldnt be able to do without a locker, you just have to be very good on the throttle, pick the right line and use your ebrake.

Now with that said I am installing front and rear lockers tomorrow.

macinyart
01-04-2008, 06:29 PM
I've been on trails that I thought were difficult and been with guys that were running "open/open"and they did just fine.
Here is a formula that I use:
2wheel drive vehicle rear open is a one wheel drive auto
4wheel drive vehicle (open/open) is a misnomer. It is only a two wheel drive vehicle.
4wheel drive (locked rear/open front) is a three wheel drive and a
4wheel drive (locked/locked) is a four wheel drive vehicle.

This is true since all the power is given to the wheel with the LEAST traction in an open differential. Go figure. :)

Billy 4 hp
01-04-2008, 07:20 PM
Let us not forget the veritable limited slip, not quite locked and not quite open.

Although not popular for rock crawling, they do have their place in the Jeeping world outside of Arizona....



:D

xjstocker
01-04-2008, 09:32 PM
i thought he was refering to running with no top or doors

Mike M
01-04-2008, 09:47 PM
The spider gears of an open differential are designed to send power to the wheel with the least resistance. This is to help with cornering as the outer wheel in the turn has further to go, so to speak, around a turn, thus must travel faster than the inside wheel in the turn. Sooooo, if you are out 4 wheeling and one wheel on the axle is up in the air or stuck in the mud, all the power will go to that wheel, and the wheel with traction will not get any power. A locker or limited slip will provide power to both wheels on the axle, regardless if one wheel does not have any traction. I believe this is accurate, at least that's how I understand it works.....

Billy 4 hp
01-04-2008, 09:53 PM
The spider gears of an open differential are designed to send power to the wheel with the least resistance. This is to help with cornering as the outer wheel in the turn has further to go, so to speak, around a turn, thus must travel faster than the inside wheel in the turn. Sooooo, if you are out 4 wheeling and one wheel on the axle is up in the air or stuck in the mud, all the power will go to that wheel, and the wheel with traction will not get any power. A locker or limited slip will provide power to both wheels on the axle, regardless if one wheel does not have any traction. I believe this is accurate, at least that's how I understand it works.....

Close, a locker actually locks the axle and disengages in a corner, so in said situation (tire in the air, one on the ground) both get equal torque...

A limited slip uses clutches, cones, gears or a combination of both to help distribute the torque equally. Due to it's design it is impossible to get an even 50 / 50 split. When they are new, they work adequately in some situations (ice, snow, slick roads)... When they wear, they can and will act almost exactly like a standard "open" differential... This wear can occur rather quickly (depending how the vehicle is used) and may require replacing of the clutch packs, cones, gears in as little as 20k miles...

JMHO...

Ryan
01-05-2008, 06:49 AM
cool thanks guys

brian lujan
01-05-2008, 09:08 AM
i run open up front and limited slip in the rear it makes difficult in a rock garden.