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Scramblin_Jim
01-08-2007, 01:54 PM
I just got done reading the thread about stacking. I did a miminial search on trail ethics and didn't see covered what I'm about to ask. Please excuse me if I have overlooked a site resource.

Being new to this "sport", I am a few months away yet from actually doing some actual trail runs with my Scrambler. I'm still doing basic improvements on the vehicle to make it safe on the trail. However, I did find the discussions on certain aspects of trail ethics most interesting and am eager to learn what I'm not to do or what I can do when out 4 wheeling.

My observations to this point (reading this formum) is that the harder the trail the more trail ethics comes into play depending on you and your vehicles capabilities. I don't see how stacking would be an issues with someone in a vehicle that is highly modified to handle 4.0 trails if they were doing less difficult trails and have experience doing it. Please correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to me to be the application of plain old common sense when on the trail.

I am assuming now, but here is how someone new to this looks at what these formums project:

1. Apply the principles of tread lightly (stay on established trails).
2. Never travel alone.
3. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to be back.
4. Don't litter, and pick up the previous idiots litter and pack it out.
5. When traveling up a hill and meeting someone coming down the hill, the vehicle coming down the hill has the right of way.
6. Don't alter the trail due to your travel on it. Don't stack rocks to improve navigation. Don't remove obsticles to improve the line of track on the trail.
7. Don't choose trails that are harder than your vechiles capabilities and/or your driving skills.
8. Don't make yourself a hazard to others by your actions on the trail.
9. Lend aid or assistance to the best of your capabilities for others having problems on the trail.
10. Have safety equipment, supplies, etc. for emergencies.

Have I missed anything? If so, what published guidelines are available for a newcomer to follow?

Hope to see you on the trail this spring!

xFallen
01-08-2007, 02:25 PM
I just got done reading the thread about stacking. I did a miminial search on trail ethics and didn't see covered what I'm about to ask. Please excuse me if I have overlooked a site resource.

Being new to this "sport", I am a few months away yet from actually doing some actual trail runs with my Scrambler. I'm still doing basic improvements on the vehicle to make it safe on the trail. However, I did find the discussions on certain aspects of trail ethics most interesting and am eager to learn what I'm not to do or what I can do when out 4 wheeling.

My observations to this point (reading this formum) is that the harder the trail the more trail ethics comes into play depending on you and your vehicles capabilities. I don't see how stacking would be an issues with someone in a vehicle that is highly modified to handle 4.0 trails if they were doing less difficult trails and have experience doing it. Please correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to me to be the application of plain old common sense when on the trail.

I am assuming now, but here is how someone new to this looks at what these formums project:

1. Apply the principles of tread lightly (stay on established trails).
2. Never travel alone.
3. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to be back.
4. Don't litter, and pick up the previous idiots litter and pack it out.
5. When traveling up a hill and meeting someone coming down the hill, the vehicle coming down the hill has the right of way.
6. Don't alter the trail due to your travel on it. Don't stack rocks to improve navigation. Don't remove obsticles to improve the line of track on the trail.
7. Don't choose trails that are harder than your vechiles capabilities and/or your driving skills.
8. Don't make yourself a hazard to others by your actions on the trail.
9. Lend aid or assistance to the best of your capabilities for others having problems on the trail.
10. Have safety equipment, supplies, etc. for emergencies.

Have I missed anything? If so, what published guidelines are available for a newcomer to follow?

Hope to see you on the trail this spring!

That's a good list Jim. You'll find several of these throughout the internet on the web. Your's is a very good start. Driving sober should be on there, unfortunately. I think #8 would cover it, but not everyone has the same sense of safety.

There's some ethics (and in some cases law or policy -- see the Rubicon trail rules as example) about potty breaks, where and how.

In planning for a trip there, we are pondering this:
http://www.rubicon4x4.com/rubicon_info_sanitation.php?osCsid=e0bf5e1bbdb23e0 448d4be5109926599

Here's another couple of lists. Yours is pretty mnuch in line.
http://www.delalbright.com/Rubicon/ethics.htm#Anchor-1905
and here
http://www.rubicon4x4.com/rubicon_info_ethics.php


Barry

1BLKJP
01-08-2007, 02:31 PM
Jim, I'm with Barry as to your list of things that one should take into consideration on trail runs.

Most of this is just common sense to anyone who wants to see our trails open and useable for years to come. If you have to stack a rock to get thru something then just take it down when you are passed. Do not alter trails to fit your vehicle. Also if one wants to attempt a trail that they think might be out of their reach then at the very least make sure you are with others who you know can run that particular trail and can help you out if need be. No one just wakes up one day knowing they can run Anaconda or Axle Alley etc....We are all looking for the adventure and that next butt puckering moment. We just ask that everyone be safe and sensible when doing so. And if you make a mistake or if you cause some harm to the trail you are just do your best to make it right. If you can't then let people know and I gaurantee that people will be willing to help make it right.

Sandee McCullen
01-08-2007, 06:24 PM
I just got done reading the thread about stacking. I did a miminial search on trail ethics and didn't see covered what I'm about to ask. Please excuse me if I have overlooked a site resource.

Being new to this "sport", I am a few months away yet from actually doing some actual trail runs with my Scrambler. I'm still doing basic improvements on the vehicle to make it safe on the trail. However, I did find the discussions on certain aspects of trail ethics most interesting and am eager to learn what I'm not to do or what I can do when out 4 wheeling.

My observations to this point (reading this formum) is that the harder the trail the more trail ethics comes into play depending on you and your vehicles capabilities. I don't see how stacking would be an issues with someone in a vehicle that is highly modified to handle 4.0 trails if they were doing less difficult trails and have experience doing it. Please correct me if I am wrong, but it seems to me to be the application of plain old common sense when on the trail.

I am assuming now, but here is how someone new to this looks at what these formums project:

1. Apply the principles of tread lightly (stay on established trails).
2. Never travel alone.
3. Always let someone know where you are going and when you expect to be back.
4. Don't litter, and pick up the previous idiots litter and pack it out.
5. When traveling up a hill and meeting someone coming down the hill, the vehicle coming down the hill has the right of way.
6. Don't alter the trail due to your travel on it. Don't stack rocks to improve navigation. Don't remove obsticles to improve the line of track on the trail.
7. Don't choose trails that are harder than your vechiles capabilities and/or your driving skills.
8. Don't make yourself a hazard to others by your actions on the trail.
9. Lend aid or assistance to the best of your capabilities for others having problems on the trail.
10. Have safety equipment, supplies, etc. for emergencies.

Have I missed anything? If so, what published guidelines are available for a newcomer to follow?

Hope to see you on the trail this spring!

Thank you........... your list is a very good start but I think a couple of other issues may help.

Re rocking: Emphasis on NOT using rocks to make the challenge easier, "use rocks for HELP but de-rock to allow the next driver the same challenge you were offered. Also note the agency issue is NOT CHANGING the natural flow.

A very important issue is we need to carry oil absorbant products with us at all times. PIG pads and Peat Sorb are both approved and accepted by all agencies. Takes up almost no space and are easy to tuck into an open space under a seat or corner.

Encourage "built vehicles" that are more inclined to roll to add fluid recovery devices to their vehicles.

A "reminder": the actions of one error reflects on ALL of us. One person cannot keep a trail open but one person can certainly close a trail!

A Tread Lightly phrase: "Pack in, pack out"....... yours and others.

zman
01-11-2007, 10:05 AM
This can go under #10....Have front and rear recovery points on your vehicle. I hate extracting those that don't. Also a recovery strap should not have metal hooks on it. ..this one may sound petty....The one who is stuck should hand his strap to the person pulling them out. This is one of them legal issue things that could haunt you in court.

zman

Scramblin_Jim
01-11-2007, 04:51 PM
This can go under #10....Have front and rear recovery points on your vehicle. I hate extracting those that don't. Also a recovery strap should not have metal hooks on it. ..this one may sound petty....The one who is stuck should hand his strap to the person pulling them out. This is one of them legal issue things that could haunt you in court.

zman

I have a strap with metal hooks. The reason for no hooks . . .

straps breaking loose and hitting something I assume?????

So I suppose all that is wanted in a loop in the end of your recovery strap? How does one hook up then?

rockwerks
01-11-2007, 04:58 PM
I have a strap with metal hooks. The reason for no hooks . . .

straps breaking loose and hitting something I assume?????

So I suppose all that is wanted in a loop in the end of your recovery strap? How does one hook up then?


either loop through or a D ring

mingoglia
01-11-2007, 07:37 PM
I have a strap with metal hooks. The reason for no hooks . . .

straps breaking loose and hitting something I assume?????

So I suppose all that is wanted in a loop in the end of your recovery strap? How does one hook up then?

A strap with hooks should only be used to drag your buddy across the intersection when he ran out of gas. It's more of a tow strap than a recovery strap. A recovery strap is designed to stretch about 30% (some yanker straps up to 50%) and give you the bungee cord affect to help slingshot you out of the muck. The ones with the hooks although not designed to work this way will still stretch. Just imagine it stretching a bit. Then as there's slack the metal hook coming off your tow point and flying backwards through your windshield. Not a very good situation to be in. :o

Mike

Sedona Jeep School
01-12-2007, 08:03 AM
Here is more on trail etiquette--been a while since I read through it--may require some revision at some point...

http://www.sedonajeepschool.com/articles/article_etiquette.html

Happy trails!

SavageSun4x4
01-12-2007, 08:30 AM
A strap with hooks should only be used to drag your buddy across the intersection when he ran out of gas. It's more of a tow strap than a recovery strap. A recovery strap is designed to stretch about 30% (some yanker straps up to 50%) and give you the bungee cord affect to help slingshot you out of the muck. The ones with the hooks although not designed to work this way will still stretch. Just imagine it stretching a bit. Then as there's slack the metal hook coming off your tow point and flying backwards through your windshield. Not a very good situation to be in. :o

Mike
X2 on Mike

Let me also add the woven hook at the end of a recovery strap is a useful tool, BUT can get you in DEEP trouble fast. Far too many time I have seen the hook thrown over a trailer hitch ball and on one occasion I saw the ball break, launch itself thru the windshield of the towing rig and catch the guys girlfriend in the forehead.

A stomach retching site, Care Flight pronounced her Dead at the scene. It also go our wheeling site closed and its still closed to this day just over 20 years later.

Use "tow hooks" which are made to bend and not break.